Architecture & Planning

I did planning in college so this is just a blog of some things i come across that interest me. Most of my own material is to do with Dublin & Cork City. The rest I do not take credit for.

allthingseurope:

Bridge of Sighs, Cambridge, UK (by Cambridge University)

allthingseurope:

Bridge of Sighs, Cambridge, UK (by Cambridge University)

colinmillerphoto:

Hook & Ladder 8 - New York City

colinmillerphoto:

Hook & Ladder 8 - New York City

enochliew:

Fort Werk aan ‘t Spoel by RAAAF & Atelier de Lyon

A grass sculpture integrating both new and historical elements such as the bunkers, the bombproof buildings, old inundation locks, the new Fort house and the amphitheatre.

(Source: raaaf.nl)

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Rapture. Photo by Dan Raven. .

The inspiration for R2D2

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Rapture. Photo by Dan Raven. .

The inspiration for R2D2

urbanbricolage:

Turning a street in Bristol into a giant water slide : urban bricolage can bring lots of fun!

I like the way participants have a look of pleasure and fear in their eyes. they seem to slide in and out of control with their body and forces of gravity. personally, I found the little adrenalin rush you get at the end, quite addictive.’ Luke Jerram

via myfairyfingers

thislandisparkland:

The park as mega-project
One of the things I’m really interested in is how very built-out cities will be able to expand park space for increasingly dense populations. In these cases, cities often turn to the harder spaces like defunct industrial areas, hydro corridors, or out of service rail lines.
An idea that hadn’t crossed my mind was to build a park bridge. But that is exactly what it seems London may be doing with a new infusion of $30 million pounds announced by the British government for a project that would build a garden bridge over the Thames. With that funding, nearly half of the $150 million pounds needed has been secured.
The park bridge also fits into the idea of the park as a new kind of high-deisgn mega-project that cities are increasingly willing to bet their money on in the hopes that it will spur the kind of real estate scramble and tourist stampede that New York’s High Line has done. 
These mega-parks with their eye-popping designs are certainly attractive—and I think as a form of mega-project to stimulate an area do better than the old idea of plunking down a stadium—but I hope the result is not thinly stretched park budgets that leave these cities struggling to keep up with maintenance.
Flashy new parks often come with with flashy designs that are expensive to maintain. And getting rich donors and foundations to pony up for maintenance is much harder than collecting cash for construction. Everyone loves to cut a ribbon after all. I would hope that the fundraising push for any new mega-park like this would also come with an endowment that can fund maintenance for years to come.
image from The Independent.

thislandisparkland:

The park as mega-project

One of the things I’m really interested in is how very built-out cities will be able to expand park space for increasingly dense populations. In these cases, cities often turn to the harder spaces like defunct industrial areas, hydro corridors, or out of service rail lines.

An idea that hadn’t crossed my mind was to build a park bridge. But that is exactly what it seems London may be doing with a new infusion of $30 million pounds announced by the British government for a project that would build a garden bridge over the Thames. With that funding, nearly half of the $150 million pounds needed has been secured.

The park bridge also fits into the idea of the park as a new kind of high-deisgn mega-project that cities are increasingly willing to bet their money on in the hopes that it will spur the kind of real estate scramble and tourist stampede that New York’s High Line has done. 

These mega-parks with their eye-popping designs are certainly attractive—and I think as a form of mega-project to stimulate an area do better than the old idea of plunking down a stadium—but I hope the result is not thinly stretched park budgets that leave these cities struggling to keep up with maintenance.

Flashy new parks often come with with flashy designs that are expensive to maintain. And getting rich donors and foundations to pony up for maintenance is much harder than collecting cash for construction. Everyone loves to cut a ribbon after all. I would hope that the fundraising push for any new mega-park like this would also come with an endowment that can fund maintenance for years to come.

image from The Independent.

bensgrabbag:

This town really was a failure of urban planning now that I look at it with adult eyes

bensgrabbag:

This town really was a failure of urban planning now that I look at it with adult eyes

The sooner we stop pretending that the bus is a suitable form of public transportation, the sooner we can attain more permanent forms.

I’m not sure how I feel about this but it has really got me thinking

Worlds first inflatable concert hall via Spoon and Tamago

Worlds first inflatable concert hall via Spoon and Tamago

mnemosyneindust:

English Market, Cork City, Co. Cork, Ireland

Always a hive of activity and a wonderful place to have in a city centre

mnemosyneindust:

English Market, Cork City, Co. Cork, Ireland

Always a hive of activity and a wonderful place to have in a city centre

thisbigcity:

Urban transformation can be achieved in many ways, with light providing incredible impact for comparatively little cost. Check out these urban icons lit up at night with the help of a little creativity (and a few thousand bulbs).

Door made of swatches
via boredpanda

Door made of swatches

via boredpanda

Glass floor and open shaft
via boredpanda

Glass floor and open shaft

via boredpanda

University College Cork via silyld on flickr

University College Cork via silyld on flickr

malexward:

America’s Finest City Timelapse Video

Damn fine work

Theme by paulstraw.